View Post

New DC eviction procedures starting this summer

In Real Estate by Richard Bianco

For years landlords and tenants alike have complained that the DC eviction procedures are unfair. Landlords complain that the process is inefficient and slow, as a result, it takes too long to regain possession of the rental unit after an eviction order. Tenants have decried the process as inhumane and resulting in damage, destruction, and theft of personal belongings.

View Post

“Takin’ it up the tailpipe:” A DC Rent Control exemption cautionary tail

In Real Estate by Richard Bianco

The DC Rent Contol Law is actually a convoluted stew of esoteric code and regulation sections. If you are burdened by logic and reason, you have little hope of understanding this flaming trash heap of a statutory scheme. However, for all of its shortcomings, it is actually clear on one point. IF a landlord is eligible for a Rent Control exemption, he or she MUST, file the exemption AND serve the affected tenants SIMULTANEOUSLY with the filing. If the landlord fails to do this, the exemption is VOID. 14 DCMR § 4101.6; Levy v. District of Columbia Rental Housing Commission 126 A.3d 684 (D.C. 2015)

View Post

DC Real Estate Law Update – March 2018

In Real Estate by Richard Bianco

There were several significant happenings this month in the world of D.C. Real Estate. Right off the bat on March 1, the Court of Appeals came down with a ruling that impacts the priority of condominium liens. (details below) Not to be outdone by the Courts, the Council amended TOPA to exempt single family accommodations and is considering a rollback of the much-decried bankruptcy exception. Additionally, there are a number of upcoming programs and events to help you stay on top of the changes.

View Post

Can spouses serve on a condo board together in DC?

In Real Estate by Richard Bianco

Recently one of my clients asked if co-owners can simultaneously serve on a condo board in DC? My first thought was, “of course they can’t, that’s ridiculous.” As it turns out, there is no DC law, or case, prohibiting condo board service by co-owners of the same unit. So unless the Bylaws address the situation, it is totally permissible.

View Post

Neighbor Construction Projects in DC

In Real Estate by Richard Bianco

If you have ever lived through a home improvement project you know it is a flat out, unmitigated pain-in-the-ass. There is constant dust, noise, and vibration. Not to mention strangers invading your property, and losing the use of facilities and utilities, sometimes for days. At the end of it, you have a nice new kitchen, bathroom or refinished basement to show for it. However, neighbor construction projects are far more frustrating. You have to put up with all of the noise and inconvenience and get none of the payoff. In fact, sometimes, your property could end up in worse shape because of someone else’s improvements. Frustrating.

View Post

Don’t refuse to rent based on criminal record until your read this

In Legislation, Real Estate by Richard Bianco

One of the things the District has gotten right is establishing, maintaining and expanding one of the most protective Human Rights laws in the nation. I am very proud to live in a place where wrongful discrimination, of any kind, is simply not tolerated. Did you know that the DC Human Rights Act also protects the criminal record of rental housing applicants?

View Post

Do you need to get your condo units to market faster?

In Real Estate by Richard Bianco

I’ve handled dozens of condominium and cooperative projects for owners and developers and by far the biggest complaint is the amount of time that the process takes from beginning to end. As experienced DC real estate developers and agents can tell you, timing is extremely important to the success of any sales project.

View Post

TOPA’s Red-Headed Stepchild

In Legislation, Real Estate by Richard Bianco

In 2008, the Council passed the District Opportunity to Purchase Act (DOPA). As the name suggests, DOPA gives the District the right to purchase residential buildings, in certain circumstances, where the owner seeks to sell to a third party. The 2008 Act left many open questions for the Agency to resolve by promulgating regulations. On December 22 2017, only nine (9) years later, DHCD has finally answered the bell, and published proposed regulations.

View Post

No Building Permits for “Slumlords”

In Legislation, Real Estate by Richard Bianco

The local media, government officials (usually when seeking re-election), housing advocates and the legal services community throw around the amorphous term “slumlord” to describe a landlord that treats tenants badly by failing or refusing to make needed repairs to a rental unit. The point at which a landlord crosses over into ‘slumlord’ territory was anybody’s guess, until now. On November 7 the D.C. Council has proposed an official definition of “slumlord.” (in a sense). The “Slumlord Deterrence Amendment Act of 2017” imposes harsh sanctions on people that own an interest in a rental property which amasses more than five (5) Class 1 violations in a year. Specifically, the slumlord in question may be denied a Basic Business License (including renewal) or Building Permit, of any kind, for a year after all of the Class 1 Violations are cured. Alright, I admit, it’s not a statutory definition in the sense that it says “A Slumlord shall be defined as….” However, it is an implicit definition, and a bright line between the slumlord and the non-slumlord, at least in the eyes of the City Council.